Oct 25
dog eyes

Sore eyes – when to take a closer look

Have you ever had a look into your pet’s adoring eyes only to discover there is something ‘not quite right’? What should you do? Can you treat it at home? Can it wait until morning? And what if your pet suddenly appears blind?

Eye problems need to be assessed swiftly. Conditions such as corneal ulcers and glaucoma can be very painful and if left untreated, can deteriorate rapidly.

If you notice any of the following changes, it is a good idea to consult a vetchat vet. After a few questions and even a video consultation, you will be advised on what treatment your pet might need and whether it is urgent or not.

Keep an eye out for the following:

  1. One or both eyes closed or squinting – this can indicate pain
  2. Swollen eyelids
or swollen eye – allergies, infection and trauma can all cause swelling
  3. Increased redness on the white of the eye
- irritation, infection or even glaucoma (increased pressure in the eye) can cause and ‘angry’ and red eye
  4. Discharge 
from one or both eyes – a sticky discharge, particularly yellow or green is not normal and can indicate infection or diseases such as dry eye
  5. Your pet is continually rubbing their eye

- this can indicate pain, an allergy or irritation
  6. Suddenly bumping in furniture or walls – a change in vision might indicate glaucoma, cataracts or the presence of underlying diseases such as high blood pressure (hypertension) or diabetes

Don’t be tempted to put any left over ointment or drops (dispensed for a human or animal) in your pet’s eyes as some medications can make certain eye problems worse. Also, if your pet has any discharge from the eye(s) it is best to gently wipe it away with damp cotton wool.


Know what your options and next steps are for your beautiful pet. Chat with a vet from vetchat today. Go to https://vetchat.com.au/book.

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